Fake Covid-19 Vaccination Record Cards Are A Growing Problem, Says FBI

People don’t post instructions and templates on how to make fake Covid-19 vaccination protocols … [+] Maps from the CDC. (Photo by Ben Hasty / MediaNews Group / Reading Eagle via Getty Images)

MediaNews Group via Getty Images

“Fake it till you make it” can be very questionable advice. “Faking a fake Covid-19 vaccination card because you can’t make a vaccination appointment” can be even worse.

As I mentioned for Forbes, a Covid-19 vaccination card is currently the only real evidence that you received the Covid-19 vaccine. To get a real version of this cardboard card, you actually need to get the Covid-19 vaccine. So if schools, businesses, and other organizations want to find out who really got vaccinated, all they have to do is look for people’s vaccination cards because nobody in our society is lying or cheating, right?

As you have probably seen, for any rule, requirement, or standard, there is no shortage of people willing to break it. Whether it’s resumes, college applications, Avengers membership cards, or just about anything else, you will at least find some people trying to forge them. So it should come as no surprise to hear that people have been handing out instructions and funds to create fake Covid-19 vaccination cards. Kevin Collier and Ben Collins reported for NBC News that such instructions and templates were posted on “Pro-Trump forums like TheDonald.win, which has been renamed Patriots.Win,” “The Extremist Forum 4chan” and “QAnon Forums” . Joseph Cox wrote an article for Vice called “I bought a counterfeit Covid-19 vaccination card on Etsy” because, essentially, he could do it fairly easily.

The Department of Health and Human Services, the Inspectorate General (HHS-OIG), and the FBI noted that such cards were “advertised on social media websites, as well as on e-commerce platforms and blogs,” and issued a stern warning about she: “If you did not receive the vaccine, Do not buy counterfeit vaccination cards, make your own vaccination cards or fill out blank vaccination cards with false information. “In this case, the FBI stands for Federal Bureau of Investigation, not Fun Bits Interactive or Fungi, Bacteria and Insects. If the FBI steps in, you know that the words “breaking the law” or “oh beep” may not be too far away. Indeed, the FBI’s warning states: “Unauthorized use of the seal of any official government agency (such as HHS or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)) is a crime and may be prohibited under Title 18 of the United States Code , Section 1017, Punishable by Law, and other applicable laws. “

Here’s a tweet from the FBI’s Knoxville, Knoxville, Tennessee, and not Johnny Knoxville:

Seena Gressin, a Federal Trade Commission (FTC) attorney, has also warned against posting pictures of your Covid-19 vaccination card. That’s because, surprisingly, people can download your image and use it and its information. In this case, the risk is greater than your face appearing on a donkey’s body or on a person’s dating profile. You can use it to create a fake Covid-19 vaccination card or steal your identity, as the following tweet warns:

Remember, as is the case with many types of scams, such scams have a huge impact on those who actually obey the rules. For example, what about the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for fully vaccinated people like you, who can now “gather indoors with fully vaccinated people without wearing a mask or 6 feet apart stay”? If people are not being honest about whether they are vaccinated, in the adapted words of this song sung by Whitney Houston, “How will I know, how will I know (some people may be wrong about their vaccination status)”. whether it is indeed safe not to wear face masks and get within six feet or a denzel (since denzel washington is about six feet tall) of others. This can make it difficult to follow guidelines that differentiate between fully vaccinated and unvaccinated tweets:

Remember that your protection against the Covid-19 coronavirus depends not only on being fully vaccinated, but also on those around you who are fully vaccinated. The FBI’s warning stated, “By falsely presenting yourself as vaccinated when entering schools, public transport, workplaces, gyms, or places of worship, you are putting yourself and others around you at risk of contracting Covid-19.” The vaccine is not 100% effective. Even after vaccination, you can still get infected with the virus, potentially get sick, and pass the virus on to others, although your chances are likely significantly lower because of the vaccine. Those chances are even less if the people around you are fully vaccinated.

The Battersea Arts Center houses the Covid-19 vaccination center

If you want to show others on social media that you received the vaccine, take a selfie without yours … [+] Covid-19 vaccination card. (Photo by Chris J Ratcliffe / Getty Images)

Getty Images

The Covid-19 vaccination card fraud begs the question of whether a national vaccination tracking system or a vaccination passport system is required. Such questions should have been considered before the introduction of the Covid-19 vaccine in 2020, which initially took place and repeatedly hit the forehead with a sneaker. Those wary of such systems have argued that such systems may have privacy and data security concerns. So this is not necessarily an easy matter. Unfortunately, those who distribute and use fake Covid-19 vaccination protocols require these considerations.

Here is a thought. If you want to take advantage of full vaccination, get full vaccination. If you are still hesitant about getting vaccinated, protect yourself and others by following all instructions on wearing face masks and social distancing in the meantime. As an adult, it’s about making choices and dealing with the consequences of those choices. You can’t have your cake and eat it too. Otherwise it wouldn’t really be cake, but could be something really weird that shouldn’t be eaten. And if you’re not really ready to decide to get vaccinated, don’t fake it. Instead, get real medical advice from real doctors who apply real science. “Fake it till you get it” can be really terrible advice.

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